Categorias
DeafSpace, Displacement e Homemaking Integral Human Development

DeafSpace, Displacement and Homemaking

Ecology of everyday life: DeafSpace and homemaking in the experience of displaced deaf people

When we talk about social and cultural ecology, driven by lines of investigation that intertwine Deaf Studies and Cultural Studies, we recognize the connection with ways of being, feeling, and understanding the world, associated with deaf people who use gestural communication systems. Sign language, as the mother tongue of communication between communities of deaf and hearing individuals, has unique linguistic complexities, due to the combination of visual-motor, visual-spatial or gestural-visual modalities. However, even deaf people without sign language fluency perceive, understand, and act on the environment based on what we know as the ontological plasticity of the being [i], which, understood in its positive polarity, enhances the deaf individual’s action, and expands the ability to transform and make connections between groups, enriching the corporeal, affective, and spiritual experience of the world.

The suppression of the deaf êthos, while the relationship built between interiority, corporeality, and place can not only lead to experiences of loneliness and marginalization but also impede opportunities for the development of the individual human ecosystem system and the necessary interdependence of ecosystems, in which the deaf and hearing they develop identities and perceptions of cultural alterity.

«The environments where we live influence the way we see life, feel and act (…) we use the environment to express our identity. We make an effort to adapt to the environment, and when it appears disordered, chaotic or full of visual and acoustic pollution, the excess of stimuli puts to the test our attempts to develop an integrated and happy identity [ii]». In the Encyclical Letter Laudato Si´, in the section dedicated to the ecology of daily life, the question of well-being and improving the quality of life as a synonym of progress emerge as central. Through the lens proposed by the relationship between well-being, quality of life, and the influence of the environment on integral human development, an analysis is proposed of the concepts of displacement, resettlement, and the ability to turn a place into a space suitable for a deaf visual ontology. of the world – DeafSpace. This [strange/foreign] place can be, simultaneously, an experience of deterritorialization shaped by the abrupt relationship of the body’s adaptation to space-in-transit and the spiritual experience of non-place.

The concept of DeafSpace is applicable to the integral relationship of the body-soul-mind with the space and the space created in the relationship with the other. It is a comprehensive and central concept in architecture, dance, theater, and school, but also in the design of shelters or complexes for displaced people and refugee resettlement.

DeafSpace matches the situation of millions of internally displaced Ukrainians, housed in gyms or refugee complexes, in the face of which a group of architects designed modular structures capable of adapting to the characteristics and needs of communities and families after the flow of displaced from Kyiv. The team of architects describes the possibilities of the concept as follows: «You can change the design, you can change the models, you can produce and use your own models, but please stay in the system of comfort. We call this dignity life. (…) You can take away our home, but you can’t take away our dignity [iii]».

In addition to housing issues related to safety and comfort, the conceptualization presented by the architects Balbek Bureau and team reveals the potential in lato sensu of the DeafSpace concept by Hansel Bauman, in the creation of place-making / homemaking in a situation of relocation during the action. humanitarian and emergency in that scenario (sensory reach, proximity, mobility, light-color, and acoustics [iv]). The aforementioned elements contribute to what is known as design guidelines in the construction of spaces. Regarding the “sensory reach” element, it is mentioned that deaf individuals have a marked environmental awareness, with broad peripheral vision and greater sensitivity to movements around them. Discomfort is felt when they have their backs to others and/or to activities, which sensorially translates a limited or impossible reach to what is happening in space. According to DeafSpace principles, the deaf person should have a wide field of vision, close to 180 degrees. In classrooms, for example, the arrangement of tables in a circular manner corroborates the principles of visual accessibility, to the detriment of tables and chairs arranged in rows. But this is just one of the elements that consider DeafSpace a concept linked to ethics and a promoter of well-being [v].

The transformation of space is made possible by the intentionality of the sentient body, which thinks through the senses, a body that maintains a constant aesthetic relationship with the surroundings and that translates into the possibility of self-affirmation, agency, and empowerment. DeafSpace, or the ´clear line of sight´[vi], is also a vector that promotes ethical intentionality in the relationship with the other, in the sense of providing opportunities for achievement, participation, fluid communication, and action aimed at the common good, not only among deaf individuals. Thus, even if scarcely studied and documented [vii][viii], the concept of DeafSpace [ix] appears largely linked to the possibilities of homemaking in deaf refugee camps/complexes or in the situation of resettlement in housing areas. It has a multidimensional connection to human ecology and daily life through the creative ability to modify the adverse effects of constraints, focusing on the dignity and interiority of each person inserted in the space of communion and belonging.

©Filipa Rodrigues

abril de 2022


[i] Malabou, C. Ontologia do acidente: ensaio sobre a plasticidade destrutiva. Florianópolis: Cultura e Barbárie (2014, p. 34).

[ii] Carta Encíclica Laudato Si’ do Santo Padre Francisco sobre o cuidado da Casa Comum, available at <https://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/pt/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html#_ftn117>

[iii] Kyiv-based architects designed new modular shelters for Ukrainian refugees, available at <https://www.fastcompany.com/90734349/these-kyiv-based-architects-designed-new-modular-shelters-for-ukrainian-refugees>

[iv] DeafSpace, Campus design and planning, available at <https://www.gallaudet.edu/campus-design-and-planning/deafspace/>

[v] Gallaudet University DeafSpace- Design Guidelines, available at <https://infoguides.rit.edu/ld.php?content_id=59890829>

[vi]  Hales, L. “Architecture’s First Full-Fledged Experiment in DeafSpace Design” 25 Jul 2013. ArchDaily. available at <https://www.archdaily.com/406845/architecture-s-first-full-fledged-experiment-in-deafspace-design>

[vii] Lems, A. (2016). Placing Displacement: Place-making in a World of Movement, Ethnos, 81:2, pp. 315-337.

[viii] Zetter, R. & Boano, C. (2009). Space and place after natural disasters and forced displacement, in Lizarralde, G., Johnson, C. and Davidson, C. (eds.) Rebuilding After Disasters: From Emergency to Sustainability. Routledge, pp. 206-230.

[ix] Bauman, H.D.L. and Murray, J.J. (2009). Deaf gain: Raising the stakes for human Diversity.

Deaf Studies Digital Journal, 1.


Ecologia da vida quotidiana: DeafSpace e homemaking na experiência de surdos deslocados

Quando falamos de ecologia social e cultural, conduzidos pelas linhas de investigação que entrecuzam os Deaf Studies e os Cultural Studies, reconhecemos a conexão com formas de estar, sentir e compreender o mundo, associada aos surdos que usam sistemas de comunicação gestual. A língua gestual, enquanto língua materna de comunicação entre comunidades de indivíduos surdos e com ouvintes, possui complexidades linguísticas únicas, pela combinação de modalidades visual-motora, visual-espacial ou gestual-visual. No entanto, mesmo os surdos sem fluência língua gestual percecionam, compreendem e atuam sobre o meio com base no que conhecemos por plasticidade ontológica do ser [i], a qual, entendida na sua polaridade positiva, potencia a sua ação do indivíduo surdo e expande a capacidade de transformar e fazer conexões entre grupos, com enriquecimento da experiência corpórea, afetiva e espiritual do mundo.

A supressão do êthos surdo, enquanto a relação construída entre interioridade, corporeidade e lugar pode, não só acarretar experiências de solidão e marginalização, como obstar a oportunidades de desenvolvimento do sistema ecossistema humano individual e da necessária interdependência de ecossistemas, na qual surdos e ouvintes desenvolvem identidades e perceções de alteridade cultural.

«Os ambientes onde vivemos influem sobre a nossa maneira de ver a vida, sentir e agir (…) usamos o ambiente para exprimir a nossa identidade. Esforçamo-nos por nos adaptar ao ambiente, e quando este aparece desordenado, caótico ou cheio de poluição visual e acústica, o excesso de estímulos põe à prova nossas tentativas de desenvolver uma identidade integrada e feliz [ii]». Na Carta Encíclica Laudato Si´, no ponto dedicado à ecologia da vida quotidiana, surgem como centrais questão do bem-estar e melhoria da qualidade de vida enquanto sinónimo de progresso. Através da lente proposta pela relação entre bem-estar, qualidade de vida e influência do ambiente no desenvolvimento humano integral, é proposta a análise entre os conceitos de displacement, ressettlement, e a capacidade de tornarmos um lugar num espaço adequado a uma ontologia visual surda do mundo – DeafSpace. Esse lugar [estranho/estrangeiro] pode ser, simultaneamente, uma experiência de desterritorialização moldada pela relação abrupta de adaptação do corpo ao espaço-em-trânsito e da experiência espiritual do não-lugar.

O conceito de DeafSpace é aplicável à relação integral do corpo-alma-mente com o espaço e do espaço criado na relação com o outro. É um conceito abrangente e central na arquitetura, na dança, no teatro, na escola, mas também no design de abrigos ou complexos de deslocados e ressettlement de refugiados.

Encontram-se correspondências do DeafSpace com a situação de milhões de ucranianos internally displaced, alojados em ginásios ou complexos de refugiados, face à qual um grupo de arquitetos concebeu estruturas modulares capazes de se adaptarem às características e necessidades de comunidades e famílias após o fluxo de deslocados a partir de Kyiv. A equipa de arquitetos descreve as possibilidades do conceito da seguinte forma: «You can change the design, you can change the models, you can produce and use your own models, but please stay in the system of comfort. We call this dignity life. (…) You can take away our home, but you can’t take away our dignity [iii] ».

Para além das questões habitacionais ligadas à segurança e conforto, a conceptualização apresentada pelos arquitetos Balbek Bureau e equipa revela o potencial in lato sensu do conceito de DeafSpace de Hansel Bauman, na criação de place-making /home making em situação de realojamento durante a ação humanitária e de emergência naquele cenário (alcance sensorial, proximidade, mobilidade, luz-cor e acústica [iv]). Os elementos referidos contribuem para o que é conhecido por design guidelines na construção de espaços. Acerca do elemento “alcance sensorial” é referido que os indivíduos surdos possuem uma acentuada consciência ambiental, com ampla visão periférica e maior sensibilidade aos movimentos ao seu redor. O desconforto é sentido ​​quando estão de costas para os outros e/ou para atividades, o que traduz sensorialmente um alcance limitado ou impossibilitado ao que se passa no espaço. De acordo com os princípios do DeafSpace, a pessoa surda deverá ter um campo de visão abrangente, próxima de 180 graus. Nas salas de aula, por exemplo, a disposição das mesas de modo circular corrobora os princípios da acessibilidade visual, em detrimento das mesas e cadeiras dispostas em filas. Mas este é apenas um dos elementos que consideram o DeafSpace um conceito ligado à Ética e promotor de bem-estar [v].

A transformação do espaço é possibilitada pela intencionalidade do corpo senciente, que pensa através dos sentidos, um corpo que mantém uma relação estética constante com o entorno e que se traduz em possibilidade de autoafirmação, agency e empowerment. O DeafSpace, ou a ´clear line of sight´[vi], é também um vetor que promove uma intencionalidade ética na relação com o outro, no sentido de proporcionar oportunidades de realização, participação, comunicação fluida e ação dirigidas ao bem-comum, não somente entre indivíduos surdos.

Assim, mesmo que escassamente estudado e documentado [vii] [viii], o conceito de DeafSpace [ix] surge amplamente ligado às possibilidades de home making em campos/complexos de surdos refugiados ou na situação de realojamento em zonas habitacionais. Possui uma conexão multidimensional à ecologia humana e da vida quotidiana pela capacidade criativa de modificação dos efeitos adversos dos condicionalismos, com foco na dignidade e interioridade de cada pessoa inserida no espaço de comunhão e pertença.


[i] Malabou, C. Ontologia do acidente: ensaio sobre a plasticidade destrutiva. Florianópolis: Cultura e Barbárie (2014, p. 34).

[ii] Carta Encíclica Laudato Si’ do Santo Padre Francisco sobre o cuidado da Casa Comum, disponível em <https://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/pt/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html#_ftn117>

[iii] Kyiv-based architects designed new modular shelters for Ukrainian refugees, disponível em <https://www.fastcompany.com/90734349/these-kyiv-based-architects-designed-new-modular-shelters-for-ukrainian-refugees>

[iv] DeafSpace, Campus design and planning. Disponível em <https://www.gallaudet.edu/campus-design-and-planning/deafspace/>

[v] Gallaudet University DeafSpace- Design Guidelines, disponível em <https://infoguides.rit.edu/ld.php?content_id=59890829>

[vi]  Hales, L. “Architecture’s First Full-Fledged Experiment in DeafSpace Design” 25 Jul 2013. ArchDaily. Disponível em <https://www.archdaily.com/406845/architecture-s-first-full-fledged-experiment-in-deafspace-design>

[vii] Lems, A. (2016). Placing Displacement: Place-making in a World of Movement, Ethnos, 81:2, pp. 315-337.

[viii] Zetter, R. & Boano, C. (2009). Space and place after natural disasters and forced displacement, in Lizarralde, G., Johnson, C. and Davidson, C. (eds.) Rebuilding After Disasters: From Emergency to Sustainability. Routledge, pp. 206-230.

[ix] Bauman, H.D.L. and Murray, J.J. (2009). Deaf gain: Raising the stakes for human Diversity. Deaf Studies Digital Journal, 1.

©Filipa Rodrigues

abril de 2022


OpenEdition sugere que esta publicação seja citada da seguinte forma:
Filipa Machado Rodrigues (24 de Abril de 2022). DeafSpace, Displacement and Homemaking. Desenvolvimento Humano Integral. Recuperado em 15 de Julho de 2024 de https://doi.org/10.58079/nkuj


Deixe um comentário

O seu endereço de email não será publicado. Campos obrigatórios marcados com *

Este site utiliza o Akismet para reduzir spam. Fica a saber como são processados os dados dos comentários.

Pesquisar OpenEdition Search

Você sera redirecionado para OpenEdition Search